Incredibly, in 1840, there were just 24 Greenly families in America.


 

24 Greenly families in the USA in 1840


Corporal John Watkins. Ancestor of John Greenly of Herefordshire (1683).

John Greenly was born in Herefordshire on 1 April 1683. He married Ann Coleman on 24 June 1709. John and Ann had 8 children. One of these children, Mary, married Stephen Watkins at Staunton on Arrow on 29 April 1738. Mary and Stephen had a son, John, who married Elizabeth Smythe in Staunton on Arrow on 14 April 1774. 

 

John and Elizabeth emigrated to America. Their grandson is the John Watkins of this story.

 

I am directly related to this John as the Mary that married Stephen Watkins was the sister of John Greenly (born 1718) who is my Great, Great, Great, Great Grandfather. 

 

Read John Watkin's account of the battle

 

Just in - below is a reference to the Greenly / Watkins family ties. 

 

GREENLY, John - of Hardwicke co. Hereford, wheelwright, 2 May 1853. Died on or about 9 May 1854.

my wife Mary;   sons John and Thomas GREENLY - all my working tools equally.
Trustees & Executors: Henry SMITH of Bidney co. Hereford gentleman,   John ABELL of Pembridge, farmer and John WATKINS of Hardwicke co. Hereford farmer.

 

 

William L. Greenly 

 

(September 18, 1813 – November 29, 1883) was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan serving as the sixth Governor of Michigan.

 

       Greenly, William L. (1813-1883) — of Adrian, Lenawee County, Mich. 

 Born in Hamilton, Madison County, N.Y., and September 18, 1813. Lawyer; member of Michigan state senate, 1839-40, 1842-43 (2nd District 1839-40, 3rd District 1842-43); Lieutenant Governor of Michigan, 1846-47; Governor of Michigan, 1847-48; mayor of Adrian, Mich., 1858-59. 

 Died November 29, 1883 (age 70 years, 72 days). Interment at Oakwood Cemetery, Adrian, Mich.

 

Shadrach B. Greenly

Shadrach B. Greenly

 

Do you have any information about this Greenly?

Shadrach B. Greenly and Nancy.

Emanuel B. Greenly


An honored veteran of the Civil war, who offered his services to the government when eighteen years of age and faithfully defended the old flag through the hour of the country's peril, is now successfully carrying on farming in Union township, Appanoose county.  He was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvaia [sic], in 1843, a son of John and Sarah (BuchterGreenly, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania and spent their entire lives in that state.  They held membership in the Dunkard church and were people of genuine worth.  Four of their sons, Andrew, Samuel, Amos and Emanuel, were volunteer soldiers in the Union Army.

 

At a very early age Emanuel B. Greenly was bound out, and he had no opportunity to secure and education, but through his own labor he learned to read and write.  His youth was one of unremitting toil and whatever he has achieved has been won through his own labor.With every department of farm labor he early became familiar.  He was married first in Pennsylvania to Miss Sarah Winkleman, a native of that state.  She died in Illinois, leaving five children: Anna, Barbara, John, Mary and Wilhelmina.  In 1880 in Hancock county, Illinois, Mr. Greenly was again married, this second union being with Mary Cane, a daughter of John and Rebecca Cane.  Mrs. Greenly, by a former marriage, had one son,Ira S. Wollin, who is now in Albia, Iowa.

 

Mr. Greenly was but eighteen years of age when the Civil war broke out.  He had watched with interest the progress of events in the south, and believing in the righteousness of the Union cause he enlisted at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in 1861, as a member of Company C, Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania Infantry, under Captain Dysart and Colonel Hambright.  Later his company was commanded by Captain Bone, and still later by Captain Dysart, and for three years Mr. Greenly remained with the army, taking part in a number of important engagements, including the battles of Perrysville, Stone River, Murfreesboro, Nashville, Chickamaugua, and Chattanooga.  He became ill with typhoid fever and also suffered from other ailments.  Because of this he was transferred to the Nineteenth Invalid Corp as a member of company G, commanded by William C. Alberger.  For a time he was in the hospital at Washington, D. C., and also at Buffalo, New York, and in Elmira he was honorably discharged.  He returned to his home with a good war record, for he had ever been loyal to his duty and faithful to the best interests of the nation.  In 1877 or '78 he moved to Illinois.  It was in the year 1880 that Mr. Greenly came with his family to Iowa, settling in Union township, Appanoose county.  He here owns seventy-eight acres of good land, upon which is a stable, a good orchard, a wood lot and pasture lands, in addition to the richly cultivated fields.  His time and attention are given untiringly to his farm work, and certainly he deserves great credit for what he has accomplished, owing his success entirely to his own efforts.  He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, being associated with Sumner Post No. 398, of Moravia, and his wife is a loyal member of the United Brethren church.


John Greenly - Emigrated from Ireland 
The Greenly Collection
The Greenly Collection _ Abraham Lincoln[...]
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